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« Was CRN Wrong? | Main | Anticipating Bad Laws? »

April 02, 2010

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James Hayton

Hi Chris, thanks for the link to my blog!

Robert A. Freitas Jr.

Hi, Chris. Your 2004-5 online conversations with Richard Jones and Philip Moriarty included significant discussion of Philip’s critique of a scheme:
http://crnano.typepad.com/crnblog/2004/11/diamondbuilding.html

for achieving the first practical steps towards the mechanosynthesis of diamondoid nanostructures, that I proposed at the Foresight Conference in Washington DC in October 2004:
http://www.molecularassembler.com/Papers/PathDiamMolMfg.htm

Interestingly, this scheme is now the basis of the first patent ever issued by the USPTO on mechanosynthesis (#7,687,146), which was awarded to Robert A. Freitas Jr. on 30 March 2010.
http://www.molecularassembler.com/Papers/US7687146.pdf

I want to thank CRN for engaging deeply on this issue five years ago. This helped advance the technical discourse in a positive direction and brought Moriarty and myself together in a fruitful collaboration that has already resulted in $3M of funding for the first diamond mechanosynthesis (DMS) experiments in history.
http://www.molecularassembler.com/Nanofactory/Media/PressReleaseAug08.htm

The Nanofactory Collaboration appreciates the efforts of CRN, and of others, that have helped our group steadily move forward toward realizing our vision of practical molecular manufacturing via the direct approach to DMS.

Tom Craver

Hmm - haven't seen copy-paste spam before. Does make it a bit harder to detect.

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