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« Fast Takeoff: Assessing Impact, Part 1 | Main | Molecular Manufacturing On Fox News »

April 14, 2009

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Forrest Higgs

Chris,

Did you actually talk to any of the core Reprap team members before you did your assessment? It would have helped your article.

As it is, it looks very much like you are trash talking Reprap which is actually working and does considerably more than you report and thereby promoting a nanotech that you aren't anywhere near having operational.

Seems a little childish, if you ask me.

Chris Phoenix

I did not intend to trash talk RepRap. What did I miss that it can do? I know they're working on printing electrical circuits, but I haven't seen that they've succeeded.

And I certainly was not trying to promote nanotech vs. RepRap. The two are quite far apart. I was trying to draw lessons from RepRap for studying self-copying manufacturing systems in general.

Chris

Forrest Higgs

Thanks so much for the amendments, Chris. I know that it is hard to keep track of progress on an open source technology project like Reprap where progress is being reported on half a dozen separate blogs.

Tom Craver

I still think a subtractive milling technology would have been a better approach for RepRap - yielding better results sooner and more reliably, potentially able to deal with a larger variety of materials including metal and materials able to withstand high heat - plaster or hardened clay for casting.

Sure it "wastes" raw material, but if it's an expensive material that violates the point of RepRap anyhow. If it's a material that can be melted down and re-used, no loss. And if it's a cheap, local material like wood or clay, it's better suited to global use.

todd andersen

The perfect storm, I would like to use this medifor for the combination. A week AGI, the internet, the reprap or similar device and a simple robot even a radio controlled no Intel on board unit. I can see big change when these things come together.

todd

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