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« Science is No Substitute | Main | C-R-Newsletter #45 »

October 01, 2006

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Jonathan Pugh

I saw this video after being posted on Brian's blog a little over a month ago. I agree with you that it is poetry in motion. The music is great too.

Jan-Willem Bats

"The message of this medium is: The nanoscale is accessible."

Why would you say so? This is just an animation and not a simulation, like the nanofactory movie is.

This clip is prettier than the nanofac clip, but that message goes better with it.

Jan-Willem Bats

For anybody interested in some serious physics simulations:

Havok 4.0: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWjSJ0PHqf8&eurl=

Alan Wake on Intel Quad Code: http://www.gamescheatcodes.co.uk/Movies/intelquadcore.htm

Chris Phoenix, CRN

Accessible not in the sense of manipulable, but in the sense of comprehensible. It's not some weird realm like quantum physics that no one can really understand.

Granted, if they showed the Brownian motion, it would look a bit less accessible. And granted, there are some nanotechnologies that accentuate the quantum.

In the nanofactory movie, the chemistry is simulated, but almost everything you see is animated based on simple solid geometry. In the cell movie, if I understand it right, every time you see a shape in atomic detail, you are seeing a rendering of atoms in experimentally determined or at least simulated positions.

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