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« Surveillance Tomorrow | Main | The Singularity is Coming »

August 13, 2005

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Brett Bellmore

I think the best answer is that nanosystems could be built so that they *could* evolve, but that there's very little to be gained by doing that, and obvious drawbacks. Most mutations are unfavorable, after all, and it takes a LOT of generations to accuulate much improvement.

I could see a limited form of "evolution" being implemented in nanofactories, though: Machine "learning" of new mechanosynthetic operations, so that the machines would grow more efficient and capable as time went by.

george

sir,
any foreign body that enters our body is taken to be an antigen then why doesn the body take the sperm as an antigen and try to act on tat wen its in the females body....

Brett Bellmore

Because, topologically, the sperm ISN'T in the woman's body. Among other reasons...

cdnprodigy

It will be when I start using better pickup lines...

Chris Phoenix, CRN

A point worth repeating is that "nanobots" such as medical devices will not have the ability to reproduce. In biology, each organism has to have come from a similar organism and be able to make more. In engineered nanosystems, each product can and should be an "evolutionary dead end" without any ability or mechanism for reproduction.

Even the kind of "machine learning" that Brett refers to does not require reproduction. A non-mutating nanofactory can make lots of non-reproducing products with various changes, and the products can then be tested and further iterations of designs produced, all using the original design of nanofactory.

There's simply no need for products to make more products. It would be like each car having to tow around an oil refinery, not to mention a mechanic's shop.

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