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« Life-Changing Dreams | Main | Industrial Revolutions »

July 01, 2005

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Daniel Steinbock

As we shift from top-down macro-manufacturing (production as gross manipulation of mass material) to bottom-up nano-manufacturing (production as ultra-efficient interaction of molecular components), we must also see a corresponding shift in the manufacture of public policy. The ordinary citizen has no real power or identity in today's social discourse, as the individual molecule plays no visible role in macro-manufacturing. But as nanotechnology of the future will be fundamentally about interacting molecules giving rise to macrostructures, so will tomorrow's society be fundamentally about citizens interacting to produce their civic world.

Mike Treder, CRN

You wrote, "tomorrow's society [will] be fundamentally about citizens interacting to produce their civic world."

That's a nice concept, Daniel, and I hope you're right. But you also wrote, "The ordinary citizen has no real power or identity in today's social discourse." What will make that change come about? Wouldn't you expect significant resistance?

Also, can you comment on how the ideas expressed in your paper might relate to Jim Garrison's "network democracy" proposal?

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