• Google
    This Blog Web

October 2011

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          

RSS Feed

Bookmark and Share

Email Feed



  • Powered by FeedBlitz

« Googling CRN | Main | Publishing Dangerous Ideas »

June 29, 2005

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451db8a69e200d8345977e269e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference State of the Future:

» C-R-Newsletter #32 from tribe.net: crnano.typepad.com
To read this on the Web, with nice formatting and hyperlinks, go to http://ww... [Read More]

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

MysticMonkeyGuru

"Many people still do not appreciate how fast science and technology (S&T) will change over the next 25 years."

Baloney. Absolute baloney. Pentagon physicist Jonathan Huebner has predicted the end of innovation on the horizon. In fact, instead of facing a future of accelerating change, we are entering a new dark age.

http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg18625066.500

This does not bode well for the future of bio, nano, info and cogno.

Jay

For the love of all things that are holy: ban this monkey character from your site.

Chris Phoenix, CRN

Hey, at least he cited a source this time. Huebner should never have gotten published, and it's a shame he's not more famous so we could laugh at him a few years from now, but I can't complain too much about this particular comment of MMG's.

But we've now had requests from two different people to ban him, and if in future he posts opinions without citing sources or any other foundation, there's a good chance we will.

Chris

Chris Phoenix, CRN

I should clarify: I didn't mean that Huebner's work shouldn't have been published at all. What I was thinking about when I wrote that was his opinion that we may be approaching the limits of technology. I don't see how anyone (including him) who studies technology could seriously think that.

I've made a blog post that goes into this in more detail:
http://crnano.typepad.com/crnblog/2005/07/limits_of_techn.html

Chris

The comments to this entry are closed.